22 June 2014

Postcards from Norway—impressions of the fjords

Enchanting Fjærland, Norway. All photography is the property of EuroTravelogue™. Unauthorized use is prohibited.
Enchanting Fjærland, Norway. All photography is the property of EuroTravelogue™. Unauthorized use is prohibited.

They call it the land of the midnight sun, where northern lights dance upon velvet skies, and in between—the blue hour—that perpetual state of twilight especially beautiful in Norway. Home to the world's most rugged coastline and Europe's longest—it's a place where unrelenting fjords carve their way through pastoral settings forging the most magnificent landscapes whose idyllic silence is broken only by thundering waterfalls and the delightful cacophony of seagulls. Voyage upon these azure waters and the mountains reveal enchanting villages steeped in Norwegian culture and tradition. Norway, Europe's final frontier, has captivated artists, writers and composers for centuries—all of whom have sought inspiration in its scenic splendor so wondrous: Edvard Grieg, Edvard Munch, Ole Bull, J.C.Dahl, Henrick Wergeland—among others! My voyage was equally inspiring and so I welcome you to this pictorial souvenir of sorts, a collection of impressions to inspire accompanied by some of my unforgettable memories.

Stavanger


Welcome to Old Stavanger or Gamle Stavanger. These quaint clapboard houses date back to the early 1800s.
Welcome to Old Stavanger or Gamle Stavanger. These quaint clapboard houses date back to the early 1800s.

We began our journey in Norway's oil capital, Stavanger—specifically Old Stavanger or Gamle Stavanger as it's known locally. This picturesque quarter nestled upon the hills along the Port of Stavanger is chock-full of cobbled lanes lined with charming clapboard houses dating back to the early 1800s.

Øvre Hommegate – Stavanger's most colorful street. Don't you agree?
Øvre Hommegate – Stavanger's most colorful street. Don't you agree?

An enchanted cottage in Old Stavanger.
An enchanted cottage in Old Stavanger.

After our tour through the historic village, we sailed into the light, so to speak, the "light fjord" or Lysefjord as it's more commonly known, our first voyage and introduction to the Norwegian fjords. We sailed past a pirate's cove and cascading waterfalls and arrived at a towering precipice perched 2,000 feet above the fjord. Intrepid explorers hike two to three hours for spectacular views from Preikestolen or Pulpit Rock.

Our Rødne Fjord cruise vessel awaits intrepid explorers at her Port of Stavanger.
Our Rødne Fjord cruise vessel awaits intrepid explorers at her Port of Stavanger.  

Picturesque beauty along the Lysefjord.
Picturesque beauty along the Lysefjord.

That squared rocky outcrop is Pulpit Rock, towering 2,000 feet above the Lysefjord.
That squared rocky outcrop is Pulpit Rock, towering 2,000 feet above the Lysefjord.

Haugesund—the Land of the Vikings


We explored this replica of an ancient Viking settlement at the Norwegian History Center in Avaldsnes, near Haugesund.
We explored this replica of an ancient Viking settlement at the Norwegian History Center in Avaldsnes, near Haugesund. 

We arrived in Haugesund to travel 800 years into the past to the reign of Harald the Longhair. At the Nordvegen History Center, we visited a reproduction of a settlement upon ancient Viking ground and stopped by Saint Olav's Church for a all-too-brief visit to Saint Mary's Needle—a 7.2-meter granite obelisk that appears to lean upon the church. According to legend, if the monolith were to fall upon the stone wall of the church, it would be dooms day for all. Fear not friends for priests have chiseled away at the opposing side to prevent such a calamity.

Our guide Harald, perhaps an eponym for the mighty King Harald the Longhair who united a divided Norway into one kingdom.
Our guide Harald, perhaps an eponym for the mighty King Harald the Longhair who united a divided Norway into one kingdom. 

Our Harald once again but this time standing in front of a Viking longhouse replica.
Our Harald once again but this time standing in front of a Viking longhouse replica. 

Leaning dangerously close to St. Olav's church, Saint Mary's sewing needle dates back to the 13th century and is the second tallest monolith in all of Norway.
Leaning dangerously close to St. Olav's church, Saint Mary's sewing needle dates back to the 13th century and is the second tallest monolith in all of Norway.

Haugesund City Hall has got to be one of the prettiest townhalls in all of Norway.
Haugesund City Hall has got to be one of the prettiest townhalls in all of Norway. 

A picturesque maritime view from my hotel room in Haugesund.
A picturesque maritime view from my hotel room in Haugesund. 

The Lothes Mat & Vinhus, a charming and delicious restaruant in Haugesund, was originally a residence built in 1850. That night at dinner, restaurant employees regaled our group with ghostly tales.
The Lothes Mat & Vinhus, a charming and delicious restaruant in Haugesund, was originally a residence built in 1850. That night at dinner, restaurant employees regaled our group with ghostly tales.

I bid you farewell from inside the potato cellar on Gloppehavn, just outside the Viking settlement. The cellar remained frostproof in the winter and cool in summer.
I bid you farewell from inside the potato cellar on Gloppehavn, just outside the Viking settlement. The cellar remained frost proof in the winter and cool in summer.

Hardangerfjord


This spectacular view of the Hotel Ullensvang and the Hardangerfjord was taken from my palatial suite in one of the hotel's turrets. A most sublime visit!
This spectacular view of the Hotel Ullensvang and the Hardangerfjord was taken from my palatial suite in one of the hotel's turrets. A most sublime visit!

Our intrepid voyage continued to pay our respects to the Queen's Fjord or Hardangerfjord, Norway's second longest fjord at 111 miles (179 kilometers) and renowned for its Folgefonna Glacier, Norway's third largest; the country's most famous waterfall—Vøringsfossen; not to mention Trolltunga or Troll's Tongue Rock—a rocky slab that cantilevers above dizzying heights but yet, offers awe-inspiring views of the fjord. This region is also known for the bountiful harvests offered up by the fruit orchards that line many of its shores.

Another view of the Hardangerfjord or Queen's Fjord.
Another view of the Hardangerfjord or Queen's Fjord.

Our Hardangerfjord ferry just dropped us off in Utne, Norway.
Our Hardangerfjord ferry just dropped us off in Utne, Norway.

As the lunch hour drew near, we ferried to the land of Utne, home to Norway's oldest hotel in continuous operation—The Utne Hotel which opened in 1722 and is as quaint and charming as they come. It's also home to Mother Utne, who managed the hotel for 70 years until her death. Some believe she still does.

Hotel Utne is Norway's oldest hotel in continuous operation—since 1722.
Hotel Utne is Norway's oldest hotel in continuous operation—since 1722.

Hotel owner Bente poses for a pic with Mother Utne.
Hotel owner Bente poses for a pic with Mother Utne.

Another view of the Hardangerfjord ferry departing for distant shores.
Another view of the Hardangerfjord ferry departing for distant shores.

From the oldest inns to the one of the most magnificent—the Hotel Ullensvang on the shores of the Hardangerfjord was home for an all-too-brief one-night stay in my magnificent parlor suite—Room 545. I couldn't believe it when I walked into my palatial palace located on the 5th floor in one of the hotel's turrets—replete with bed, bathroom with a glass wall behind the tub to enjoy the fjord's views and then, though another door, adjacent to my wrap-around balcony, was my very own parlor—an exquisitely furnished living room elegantly appointed with all the trimmings! I could have stayed for a month!

The spectacular Hotel Ullensvang in Lofthus, Norway, on the Hardgangerfjord.
The spectacular Hotel Ullensvang in Lofthus, Norway, on the Hardgangerfjord.

Located in Lofthus, the Hotel Ullensvang has been managed by five generations of Utnes and has come a long way since its humble beginnings in 1848 when Hans Utne opened his one-bedroom inn in a loft above his steamship agency.

Looking out into the Hardangerfjord from the Hotel Ullensvang.
Looking out into the Hardangerfjord from the Hotel Ullensvang.

On the hotel's grounds, the music of Edvard Grieg filled our imaginations as we paid a visit to his hytte or cabin, relocated here from elsewhere in Lofthus. Inside, we found a writer's desk and a piano, however, it remains to be proven that Grieg actually tickled its ivories.

Edvard Grieg's hytte or hut was relocated to the gardens of the Hotel Ullensvang.
Edvard Grieg's hytte or hut was relocated to the gardens of the Hotel Ullensvang.

Me and El Maestro Grieg.
Me and El Maestro Grieg.

The next day, up before the roosters I might add, we were heading to our journey on the rails, Flåmsbana or the Flåm Railway from Myrdal to Flåm but first we had to catch another train from Voss to Myrdal.

Awaiting our train to Myrdal at the historic Voss train station.
Awaiting our train to Myrdal at the historic Voss train station.

Flåm


Flåm—one of the most picturesque villages in Norway. This photo was taken from as we descended into the Flåm valley aboard the Flåmsbana or Flåm Railway, one of the world's most beautiful railways.
Flåm—one of the most picturesque villages in Norway. This photo was taken from as we descended into the Flåm valley aboard the Flåmsbana or Flåm Railway, one of the world's most beautiful railways.

Upon our arrival in Myrdal, it was all aboard the Flåm Railway for one of my most memorable experiences in Norway. The Flåm Railway or Flåmsbana is an hourlong train ride on one of the world's most scenic railways not to mention the world's steepest railroad gradient as well. From Myrdal's lofty perch of 2,850 feet (866 meters) above sea-level, the train descends the craggy cliffs along a 12.5-mile (20-km) track through dramatic landscapes, 20 mountain tunnels and a surprise stop at the Kjosfossen or Kjos Waterfall where we disembarked to the enchanting sounds of the hulder, mysterious sirens who dwell in sylvan lands and bewitch unwary travelers with their hypnotizing melodies. I too was hypnotized when their sweet song filled the mist of the falling waters.

All aboard the Flåmsbana from Myrdal to Flåm.
All aboard the Flåmsbana from Myrdal to Flåm.

Another pastoral view of an idyllic paradise.
Another pastoral view of an idyllic paradise.

After our adventure on the rails, it was lunchtime at yet another historic Norwegian inn—the Fretheim Hotel in Flåm. We were welcomed by manager Mette who regaled us with the hotel's history as well as that of the Fretheim family whose matron Marthe Fretheim, like Mother Utne, continues to "oversee" operations today. After our tour of the property including Marthe's private quarters, Mette escorted my colleague and me on a tour through old Flåm, the most picturesque little village we first caught glimpse of as we descended into the Flåm valley aboard the rails. She drove us in her own car through one of the most picturesque places in Norway and shared her experiences growing up in this valley of the fjords. I even encountered my first yak, although I've heard of these magnificent creatures, I've never seen them up close and personal until that memorable day in Old Flåm.

It was in 1879 when Christen Fretheim decided to build a guest house for his English tourists. The first of these was and is still in use—the English Villa. It's from these modest beginnings that the Fretheim Hotel quickly grew to the 122-room inn we see today.
It was in 1879 when Christen Fretheim decided to build a guest house for his English tourists. The first of these was and is still in use—the English Villa. It's from these modest beginnings that the Fretheim Hotel quickly grew to the 122-room inn we see today.

Storybook village of Flåm as seen from Flåm Railway.
Storybook village of Flåm as seen from Flåm Railway.

Inside the Flåm Kyrkje or Old Church pictured in the above photo. This church was built in 1667.
Inside the Flåm Kyrkje or Old Church pictured in the above photo. This church was built in 1667. 


Balestrand


The Sognefjord provides a stunning backdrop for the Kviknes Hotel as seen from my room.
The Sognefjord provides a stunning backdrop for the Kviknes Hotel as seen from my room.

As the day drew to a close, our ferry left Flåm at 4:30 p.m. en-route along the King's Fjord or the Sognefjord—Norway's longest and deepest plunging to icy depths of 4,300 feet. Truly the king of fjords! For the next three days, we called Balestrand home—a quaint hamlet clinging to the shores of the Sognefjord. Because of its unique quality of light, Balestrand has attracted artists, writers and tourists since the 19th century, including Dahl who built his residence here in 1893. At its heart is the "Jewel of the Sognefjord" or the Kviknes Hotel, one of Norway's largest historic inns. Owned by the Kvikne family since its doors opened in 1877, the exquisite edifice embellished with ornate latticework is built in the "swiss-style" architecture that was prevalent in Norway for much of the 19th century and can be seen on many buildings throughout Balestrand as well as other locations in Norway. Needless to say, it's positively enchanting.

The visual romance of Balestrand, Norway.
The visual romance of Balestrand, Norway.

The English Church in Balestrand was built at the request of Knut Kvikne's wife who was a English reverend's daughter. Sadly she passed before the church's completion in 1897.
The English Church in Balestrand was built at the request of one of the founding brothers of the hotel, Knut Kvikne's wife who was a English reverend's daughter. Sadly she passed before the church's completion in 1897.

Exquisite gardens can be found throughout Balestrand.
Exquisite gardens can be found throughout Balestrand.

On Fourth of July, we stopped by the ciderhuset or cider house on the hill for a tour and a tasting.
On Fourth of July, we stopped by the ciderhuset or cider house on the hill for a tour and a tasting.

Idyllic splendor in Balestrand.
Idyllic splendor in Balestrand.

Sweeping panoramic views from my room at the Kviknes Hotel.
Sweeping panoramic views from my room at the Kviknes Hotel.

Did you know?

Kaiser Wilhelm II vacationed here before WWI and beneath one of the chairs in the banquet room, a plaque was found. No one knows exactly who burned this inscription to the plaque but it reads:“Kaiser Wilhelm sat in this seat on Saturday, July 25th, 1914 in the afternoon when he was visiting Professor Hans Dahl… to say goodbye. He left at 6:00PM when he received the news that war had broken out between Austria and Serbia.”

Fjærland and the Bøyabreen Glacier


On approach to perhaps the second-most picturesque village in Norway—Fjærland. The Hotel Mundal is partially hidden behind the trees at the right.
On approach to perhaps the second-most picturesque village in Norway—Fjærland. The Hotel Mundal is partially hidden behind the trees at the right.

Undoubtedly one of the prettiest villages in all of Norway is Fjærland located at the end of the Fjærlandfjord, a branch of the mighty Sognefjord. Gateway to the Jostedalsbreen Glacier, Norway's largest; and the Norsk BreMuseum where Ötzi the 5,000-year-old iceman lives; the village of Fjærland is home to the 3-mile Norwegian Book Town—Bokbyen—renowned for its collection of second-hand books housed in quaint little sheds lining the shore. Look further and you'll see the historic Hotel Mundal that dates back to 1891. I heard we may even see a mammoth or two.

Welcome to Fjærland, Norway, one of the most charming and picturesque ports in Norway. The Fjordstuer Hotel can be seen in the background.
Welcome to Fjærland, Norway, one of the most charming and picturesque ports in Norway. The Fjordstuer Hotel can be seen in the background.

Does it get any more beautiful than this?
Does it get any more beautiful than this?

Being chased by mammoths at the Norsk BreMuseum.
Being chased by mammoths at the Norsk BreMuseum.

The Bøyabreen Glacier.
The Bøyabreen Glacier.

Bergen — Gateway to the Fjords


Norway's second largest city, Bergen, as seen from the top of Mount Fløyen.
Norway's second largest city, Bergen, as seen from the top of Mount Fløyen. 

Our final stop of our epic trek through the Norwegian fjords was Bergen—gateway to the fjords and Norway's second-largest city. After our 4-hour ferry from Balestrand—a most welcome retreat into slumber after rising with the rooters on that day—we disembarked in Bergen where we spent our final three days. At its heart is Bryggen, the historical center of this big-port city with small-town charm. We toured these slightly leaning and sinking storehouses that date back to 1702 and learned of the ways of life of the storekeepers and their workers.

The view of Bergen as we climbed up Mount Fløyen aboard the Fløibanen funicular—a most spectacular ride!
The view of Bergen as we climbed up Mount Fløyen aboard the Fløibanen funicular—a most spectacular ride!

Our first night's dinner turned out to be quite the adventure! We hopped onboard another railway, this time it was the Fløibanen—a funicular that climbs the precipitous slopes of Mount Fløyen to the Fløyen Restaurant built in 1925 with the most commanding views of coastal Bergen. Be sure to grab the front seat of the tram for a most amazing ascent!

Outside the Fløyen Restaurant.
Outside the Fløyen Restaurant.

Fløyen Restaurant high atop Mount Fløyen offers sweeping jaw-dropping views of Bergen.
Fløyen Restaurant high atop Mount Fløyen offers sweeping jaw-dropping views of Bergen.

How could you possibly come to Norway without listening to the symphonic melodies of Edvard Grieg? We were off to Troldhaugen to listen to a lovely concert performed at one of the most beautiful eco-friendly concert halls I have ever seen—the Edvard Greig Museum and villa. Blanketed by a roof of sod, you would never believe that grass hut is one of the most beautiful concerts venues that even invites nature inside to provide a stunning backdrop as you listen to Grieg's piano concertos resounding through the hall.

You won't believe the interior of this grass-roofed hut.
You won't believe the interior of this grass-roofed hut.

Inside the Edvard Grieg Concert Hall in Troldhaugen.
Inside the Edvard Grieg Concert Hall in Troldhaugen. 

Alas, it was our final day in Norway and my colleague and I had accumulated a little too much to fit into our luggage so off we went to do a little shopping in the Bergen city square. After we purchased our much-needed carry-ons, we asked the salesperson to recommend the place that makes the best pastries in all of Bergen. Much to our surprise and delight, the Baker Brun was just around the corner from our hotel so off we went to sample Bergen's signature danish—skillingsbolle, a cinnamon bun that was simply put, out of this world! With coffee in hand, we kicked back and enjoyed our respite in sweet indulgences!

Welcome to the Baker Brun, home of Bergen's signature skillingsbolle.
Welcome to the Baker Brun, home of Bergen's signature skillingsbolle

Inside the Baker Brun.
Inside the Baker Brun. 

It's a good thing we arrived in time, only one skillingsbolle remained after we selected two.
It's a good thing we arrived in time, only one skillingsbolle remained after we selected two.

Troll Hunting

Throughout my journey, I was known as the "Troll Hunter," hunting and capturing these impish creatures and persuading them to pose for a picture with me. To say they hammed it up a bit is an understatement as you'll see.

The Trollhunter with his first new friend in Voss, Norway.
The Trollhunter with his first new friend in Voss, Norway. 

Steadfast in his trek to seek out and find the mysterious and elusive trolls of Norway, we find the Trollhunter once again posing with another new friend at the top of Mount Fløyen in Bergen.
Steadfast in his trek to seek out and find the mysterious and elusive trolls of Norway, we find the Trollhunter once again posing with another new friend at the top of Mount Fløyen in Bergen.

Sadly, our epic journey through the Norway fjords was coming to an end but the friends and memories I have made along the way I will cherish forever. I was living in each and every moment—reveling in scenic lands steeped in history, delighting in encounters with people whose traditions customs were once foreign to me, indulging in delectable tastes every chance I got—these, my final impressions, mark unforgettable moments of a lifetime!

And so we say goodbye to Norway for now.

A special thanks to my friends at Visit Norway and Fjord Norway for inviting me on the intrepid journey. All opinions expressed are my own, with some unsolicited help from the trolls.

Additional Reading:

33 comments:

  1. What a fantastic journey! I love the view from Hotel Ullensvang! Those gorgeous fjord remind me so much of Southeast Alaska but our cities aren't nearly as charming. Stavanger is so lovely and must have been perfect for strolling in the summer evening sunlight. I also think the Nordvegen History Center looks awesome with its inverted ship roofs!

    How long were you in Norway and what would be a reasonable trip length to see all this and Oslo?

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    1. Hi there Christina! It was a journey of a lifetime I tell you! Such spectacular surroundings everywhere we went! AMAZING! I was there this time last year for 9 days and loved every minute of it! I think 9 or 10 days would be enough time to see this and Oslo. If you're extend your destinations, you'll need to add more days. But that's not so terrible is it? ;) Thank you so much for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!

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  2. What a feast of images! You've presented Norway in such a colourful way! Love it!

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    1. Marlys, I believe I set a new world record for myself ... 55 images in this post alone and I had about 10 more as well. I'll just need to continue a Part II at another time! Thank you for stopping by and for your kind compliments!

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  3. Wow, Jeff, you've really been around. You've even seen places that I haven't visited yet. I'm inspired to head west again. Good season for it, too :)

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    1. Sophie, I am extremely blessed my friend, truly. I have been to many and yearn for so much more. It's an insatiable appetite that may never be satisfied. But that's a good thing! Thank you so much for stopping by to share your thoughts!

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  4. Wow, wow, wow, what an epic adventure, Jeff. I read every word, looked at every photo at least 3 times. You had me so totally immersed, I was disappointed when I looked out my window and didn't see some of that lush carpet of green and color. Thanks for the virtual tour. Norway is amazingly beautiful.

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    1. Hi there Marcia! I am honored by your kind compliments and loving the fact that you read every single word! Thank you! This post was as epic as my journey that I will never forget! One day, you will look out of your window and see spectacular Norway looking back! Thank you for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!

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  5. Mammoth, trolls and gorgeous scenery - what a fascinating trip

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    1. I couldn't agree with you more Heather. Let's not forget the skillingsbolle too!! ; ) Thanks so much for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!

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  6. Your photos are stunning, Jeff! Every time you post about your Norway trip, it makes me more determined to get there!!

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    1. Hi there Lisa! Thank you so much for your kind compliments. I had so many more to share with everyone, still do, but I also needed to go back and relive my journey. It truly was an epic voyage!!

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  7. That was a lengthy read, but completely worth it. And if posts can make a person ache with need and longing, this is it. Mountains, fjords, the colours, the deep blues. I recognize aspects from my own home province (British Columbia), my time on New Zealand's South Island, as well as common traits found in southern Sweden and northern Denmark. But still, I have to ask: where do I sign up? Thanks for this great set of postcards, Jeff!

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    1. Oh Henry!! I can't thank you enough for all of your praise! It means the world to me and thank you for taking the time to read between the pics!! That means even more! You are so welcome my friend and and thank you for taking the time out of your busy day to escape to Norway with me! I am honored, truly!

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  8. I love these photos! So vibrant and beautiful! I must admit, Norway has never really crossed my mind as a place to visit until now. Added it to my (very long) travel list!

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    1. Hi Rhonda! You of all people would absolutely love the scenic wonder of Norway! Everywhere you turn, a Kodak moment waiting for the capture! The charming villages, the historic architecture and of course the spectacular fjords!! You must move this up on your bucket list for sure! You can thank me later. ; ) Thx so much for stopping by and for your kind words!

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  9. You really experienced this part of Norway! And your words and images are perfect; I felt as if I was along with you, and I haven't seen a few areas you were at (yet!). Thank you for this marvelous post!

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    1. Hi there Cindi! I am truly honored by your praise but I owe it all to the natural beauty of Norway! Like many others before me and after me, Norway's legacy to inspire lives on and so I seized the opportunity and allowed it to draw me in too! Thanks so much for stopping by and be sure to stop by again to let me know about your future travels.

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  10. I would love to have followed in your footsteps. Everything about this trip looks scenic and fun. I am in Newfoundland right now and just visited the Root Cellar Capital of Canada (Elliston) - where I saw those mounds of dirt like they have in Norway for storing potatoes.
    You have made me very jealous. Your photos really show this part of Norway off to great effect.

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    1. Hi Leigh! One day you will just have to follow in my footsteps! It's an epic adventure that will live on forever. I had so much fun putting this piece together and reliving all of the wonderful memories I have. Thank you so much for your kind compliments but Norway makes it easy! It's simply breathtaking!

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  11. Wow! How beautiful Norway looks! And what a beautiful write-up! You make us want to visit :-). The funicular ride to Floyen Restaurant looks especially fun...

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    1. Hi Janice! Thank you so much for your kind words, I am truly honored! If you haven't visited Norway, you must. As you can see, it's scenic splendor! Thank you for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!!

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  12. Well done! Great job in capturing the beauty of Norway! I really miss it now! Next time you have to hike the Preikestolen - it's that amazing!

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    1. Hi there Mark and thanks so much for stopping by! I agree about Preikstolen, the next time for sure! Two of my colleagues hiked it that morning and they couldn't get over the amazing views! I won't miss it twice, that much is certain!

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  13. How incredibly green Norway is, Jeff! Your photos are amazing. I especially like the one of you in the potato cellar. In addition to said potatoes and hefty, scrumptious baked goods, I'd love to learn more about Norwegian food.

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    1. Hi there Lesley! Thanks so much for stopping by and for your kind words! Norwegian food? Think fish and lots of it! ;) But oh so delicious!! I have never tasted such scrumptious shell fish and white fish in my life!! You must go and sample it locally!!

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  14. I have never been to Norway but it is high on my wish list. It looks amazing. The mountains, fjords, glacier ... I cannot wait to explore them myself one day. That first photo is also very cool with the reelection of the houses in the water.

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    1. Hi Freya! You must bump up Norway on your list right away!! For such a spirited adventure like yourself, I just know you would have the MOST AMAZING adventure! Thank you for stopping by and for your kind compliments as well!

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  15. Jeff! What a fantastic itinerary, such fun! I love the troll hunting you. Aren't they the strangest..uncute things you've ever seen?!

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    1. Hi there Corinne! I couldn't agree with you more my friend! It was an epic voyage! Funny about the troll hunting ... my friends at Innovation Norway coined that for me during the journey when I posted my troll encounters! Such adorable creatures, aren't they? Thanks so much for stopping by!

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  16. Lovely! This post took me RIGHT back to my tour around Norway several years ago. Especially love your "Does it get any more beautiful than this?" captioned photo.

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    1. HI there Dana and thanks so much for stopping by and for your kind compliments! As you can see, I loved everything about Norway!

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Thank you for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!